Twitter API

All things Twitter API. Updates, announcements, great apps, and more. From the @twitterapi team.

June 15, 2009 at 11:00am
1 note
Bitter is a Twitter app for Boxee, a media center interface for personal computers.

We love seeing Twitter apps beyond the desktop.

- @al3x

Bitter is a Twitter app for Boxee, a media center interface for personal computers.

We love seeing Twitter apps beyond the desktop.

- @al3x

June 12, 2009 at 1:33pm
0 notes

Welcome to the team, @rsarver & @noradio!

I’m proud to announce two recent additions to the Twitter API Team: Ryan Sarver (@rsarver) and Marcel Molina (@noradio).

Ryan will be looking after the business side of the API. He comes to us from Skyhook Wireless, the people who help your iPhone figure out where you are, amongst other things. We hope to put his expertise in geo technologies to good use as we explore per-tweet geolocation and other new features. If you have questions about getting your company hooked up to the Twitter API, Ryan is the guy to talk to.

Marcel has already started working on new API methods, as well as improving our existing code base. Marcel was a member of the Ruby on Rails core team, and worked most recently at educational gaming company Grockit. You can expect Marcel’s passion for beautiful code to shine through as the API evolves.

Give them both a big welcome over on Twitter!

If you’re an engineer interested in working on the Twitter API, apply today. The API/Platform team is one of the smallest at Twitter, but we have a huge impact. If you want to help shape the future of open, developer-friendly, one-to-many communication, now’s the time to join us.

- al3x

June 4, 2009 at 12:31am
1 note

Buddies, friends, and sources

My timeline is filled with three type of accounts: buddies, friends, and sources.

Buddies are the users I actively watch and mention. @al3x is a buddy. We work next to each other and thus we occasionally mention one another.

Friends are folks I casually eavesdrop upon. I am friends with @ev. We don’t ever @reply, but I certainly want to know what he has to say.

Sources are accounts that push data. @sfearthquakes is my SMS enabled source of earthquake news. I want to know when a quake happens but the data is secondary to my main Twitter experience.

It is fairly straight-forward to assume a user’s group. If I’ve mentioned or messaged a user, he is likely a buddy. If the account is otherwise @replying people, twittering links, and updating status (proving it is a person) then it is probably a friend. And if the account is clearly a one to many broadcast of news, with no mentions of other users, then it can be assumed a source.

When I have a lot of time I like to see all three of these groups in my timeline. However sometimes I just want to read my buddies, or only my friends. There are many examples of Twitter clients that enable me to manually specify groups, but buddies, friends and sources change.

Are any clients experimenting with grouping accounts based on user behavior? Let @twitterapi know. We’d like to try it out.

- @dougw

May 29, 2009 at 12:26pm
2 notes

We Like Betas (Alphas Too!)

There are new Twitter API-powered sites and applications launching every day, something we’re very proud of. Sometimes we on the API Team get a chance to take a peek at them before they launch, but more often than not it’s news to us.

On the one hand, we’re happy that our APIs and the processes around them are stable enough that people feel comfortable launching their projects without putting us in the loop. On the other, we love trying new stuff - that’s a big part of the reason why we work on the API - and we’d love to share some constructive feedback.

If you’ve got a Twitter app that’s ready for some outside testing, just shoot us an @reply or an email. We might be able to contribute suggestions towards improving the performance or user experience. We might be able to put you in touch with other developers who are solving similar problems.¬†Or, we might just fall in love and evangelize your app.

We’ll happily make time to try your app out. Just let us know!

- @al3x

7:20am
1 note
It makes sense to explicitly tell your users when any problems they are experiencing are the result of issues upstream. CoTweet does this well. As their tech blog explains, they are able to illustrate where the problem lies. This keeps the quality expectation of their product high, even when Twitter is throwing whales.
- @dougw

It makes sense to explicitly tell your users when any problems they are experiencing are the result of issues upstream. CoTweet does this well. As their tech blog explains, they are able to illustrate where the problem lies. This keeps the quality expectation of their product high, even when Twitter is throwing whales.

- @dougw